Capoeira Wiki-Word of the Week: Batizado (Update)

This feature is designed to spark your interest in researching the world of capoeira's vocabulary, history, and philosophy.

Our Capoeira Wiki-Word series invites you to research the word of the week and post your definition(s) and translations. At the end of each week, the entries will be reviewed and then summarized into a translation and a definition of the Capoeira Wiki-Word of the week.

Submit your entries in the comments section below!

This week's Capoeira Wiki-Word is:

Batizado

ps

Don't forget to cite your sources


Update

 

The letter 'z', when found between two vowels is pronounced in Portuguese with what we are accustomed to in English as a 's' sound.  For example:  soup, surreal, serpent  (there are exceptions, but batizado is not one of them)

Batizado translates from Portuguese to English as baptized, not baptism or the ceremony of a baptism.  While this may seem like a subtle distinction, it isn't from a Portuguese speaker's perspective.  As we learn more about capoeira, we need to value the combination of heritages that gave seed to the art we know and love. 

Also, it is important to understand that Mestre Acordeon's teacher, Mestre Bimba, created this ceremony.

 

From pages 65-70 of the book, "The Sage of Mestre Bimba" by Raimundo Cesar Alves de Almeida's, Mestre Itapoan.

During the batizado ceremony, each new student received a nickname.  From then on, he would be known by that name in the academy and in the world of Capoeira.  The nickname would become his nome de guerra, his battle name.  The nicknme might be based on his physical type, the neighborhood he lived in, his profession, the style of clothes he wore, his attitude, or something he was particularly gifted at.
... Mestre (Bimba) said that in the past, the nickname also served to disguise a capoeirista's idetity, making it hard for the police to find him.
... When a student was baptized at Mestre's Academy, he played to the sound of the berimbau for the first time, since training in the sequencias took place without music.  Mestre would choose a graduated student and play São Bento Grande (de Regional), which is the basic berimbau accompaniment to Capoeira Regional.  The graduate would play with the beginner in a way that forced him to use defenses and show the attacks he had learned.  At the end of the game, Mestre would have the beginner stand in the center of the roda and ask the graduated student to give him a nickname, or Mestre himself would choose one.  After the name was given, everyone would applaud and Mestre would say:  "Let's have a blessing from the godfather."  The beginner would extend his hand to the graduate who had baptized him and he would receive a benção - a kick that would knock him down.  This part of the ceremony was optional and only took place if the student wanted it.  There were some very good beginners who avoided receiving the benção.
... The batizado is for the beginners.  It is their day and they should have a chance to look good.  Mestre Bimba taught us that is the law of batizado and the law of Capoeira.

Capoeira Song of the Week: Peixe Pulou Na Maré

You submit the songs.  We show you the lyrics, translation, and give some phonetic spelling to help your pronunciation.

The format works like this:

The lyrics in Portuguese are in bold

The phonetic spelling for pronunciation is in italics with the STRESSED SYLLABLES IN ALL CAPITALS with syllables se-pa-ra-ted by dash-es

The English translation is in regular text.

 

Peixe Pulou Na Maré

 

Olha o peixe pulou na maré

OHL-yah ooh PEY-sheeh pooh-LOH nah mah-REH

Look the fish jumped in the tidewater

Olha o peixe pulou na maré

OHL-yah ooh PEY-sheeh pooh-LOH nah mah-REH

Look the fish jumped in the tidewater

 

(coro/chorus)

Olha o peixe pulou na maré

OHL-yah ooh PEY-sheeh pooh-LOH nah mah-REH

Look the fish jumped in the tidewater

Olha o peixe pulou na maré

OHL-yah ooh PEY-sheeh pooh-LOH nah mah-REH

Look the fish jumped in the tidewater

 

A maré tá cheia ioió

Ah mah-REH tah SHEY-ah yoh-YOH

The tide is high ioió

A maré tá cheia iaiá

Ah mah-REH tah SHEY-ah yah-YAH

The tide is high iaiá

 

(coro/chorus)

A maré tá cheia ioió

Ah mah-REH tah SHEY-ah yoh-YOH

The tide is high ioió

A maré tá cheia iaiá

Ah mah-REH tah SHEY-ah yah-YAH

The tide is high iaiá

 

A maré subiu

Ah mah-REH sooh-BEEH/ooh

The tide goes out

 

(coro/chorus)

Sobe maré

SOH-beeh mah-REH

Come in tide

 

A maré desceu

Ah mah-REH deh-SEH/ooh

The tide goes out

 

(coro/chorus)

Desce maré

DEHS-seeh mah-REH

Go out tide

 

Olha a maré de Maré

OHL-yah ah mah-REH deeh mah-REH

Look at the tidewater of Maré

 

(coro/chorus)

Vou pra ilha de maré

Voh prah EEHL-yah deeh mah-REH

I'm going to the Island of Maré

Capoeira Fitness Tip of the Week

This feature is designed to give you functional training tools for your off days when you are not training capoeira.  We will be looking at various excercises, tools, and resources that we will have as resources for you to devise a strategy for your overall physical development as a capoeirista.

The goals will be:

Overall Physical Health

Promoting Longevity

Improved Performance in your capoeira training and game

This video gives a refreshing and thorough walk through of just what good posture is.  This is an essential bit of reference material, for posture impacts our ability to perform at our best in the roda.

Enjoy!

Capoeira Wiki-Word of the Week: Capacete

This feature is designed to spark your interest in researching the world of capoeira's vocabulary, history, and philosophy.

Our  Capoeira Wiki-Word series invites you to research the word of     the week  and post your definition(s) and translations. At the end of     each week,  the entries will be reviewed and then summarized into a     translation and a  definition of the Capoeira Wiki-Word of the week.

Submit your entries in the comments section below!

This week's Capoeira Wiki-Word is:

Capacete

ps

Please cite your sources

Capoeira Song of the Week: Na Beira do Mar, Na Areia

You submit the songs.  We show you the lyrics, translation, and give some phonetic spelling to help your pronunciation.

The format works like this:

The lyrics in Portuguese are in bold

The phonetic spelling for pronunciation is in italics with the STRESSED SYLLABLES IN ALL CAPITALS with syllables se-pa-ra-ted by dash-es

The English translation is in regular text.

 

Na Beira do Mar, Na Areia

 

Na beira do mar, na beira do mar, na areia

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah ah-REY-ah

At the sea's edge, at the sea's edge, in the sand

Na beira do mar, na beira do mar, na areia

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah ah-REY-ah

At the sea's edge, at the sea's edge, in the sand

 

(coro/chorus)

Na beira do mar, na beira do mar, na areia

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah ah-REY-ah

At the sea's edge, at the sea's edge, in the sand

Na beira do mar, na beira do mar, na areia

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah ah-REY-ah

At the sea's edge, at the sea's edge, in the sand

 

Na beira do mar, vi um côco balançar

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, eh/ooh veeh oohnh KOH-kooh bah-lahn-SAHRH

At the sea's edge, I saw a coconut wobble

Tomei a água de côco, mas dexei o côco no lugar, na areia

Toh-MEY ah AH-gwah deeh KOH-kooh, mayez deh-SHEY ooh KOH-kooh nooh looh-GAHRH nah ah-REY-ah

I drank the coconut's water, but I left it where it was, in the sand

 

(coro/chorus)

Na beira do mar, na beira do mar, na areia

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah ah-REY-ah

At the sea's edge, at the sea's edge, in the sand

Na beira do mar, na beira do mar, na areia

Nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah BEY-rah dooh mahrh, nah ah-REY-ah

At the sea's edge, at the sea's edge, in the sand